Jun 29, 2015

RobinCeleste's World • npr: States may continue using a popular but...

npr: States may continue using a popular but controversial drug in lethal injection executions, the Supreme Court ruled on Monday in a 5-4 decision. In Glossip et al. v. Gross et al., the question was whether or not to allow states to use midazolam, a drug used to render inmates unconscious before executing them. The April 2014 execution of Clayton Lockett in Oklahoma helped bring the...

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